Spell Check Dutch - Spell Check Anywhere

Spell Check Anywhere allows you to spell check in any Windows program using a Dutch dictionary.  The Dutch dictionary contains 178,000 words.

Interesting Facts About Dutch

The West Germanic dialects can be divided according to tribe (see Germanic tribes), and according to the extent of their participation in the High German consonant shift (Low Germanic against High Germanic). The present Dutch standard language is practically completely based on Low Franconian (sometimes called Old Dutch --spell check) dialects spoken in the Low Countries which on its term derived from Old Frankish, the language of the Ancient Franks. Dutch left the prehistoric phase in 476-496 when the Salic Law was written, containing a great number of Low Franconian words, and even a few sentences.

An early Dutch recorded writing is: "Hebban olla vogala nestas hagunnan, hinase hic enda tu, wat unbidan we nu" ("All birds have started making nests, except me and you, what are we waiting for"), dating around the year 1100, written by a Flemish monk in a convent in Rochester, England. For a long time this sentence was considered to be the earliest recorded Dutch.

A process of standardization started in the Middle ages, especially under the influence of the Burgundian Ducal Court in Dijon (Brussels after 1477). The dialects of Flanders and Brabant were the most influential around this time. The process of standardization became much stronger at the start of the 16th century, mainly based on the urban dialect of Antwerp. In 1585 Antwerp fell to the Spanish army: many fled to the Northern Netherlands, especially the province of Holland, where they influenced the urban dialects of that province. In 1637 a further important step was made towards a unified language, when the first major Dutch Bible translation was created that people from all over the United Provinces could understand. It used elements from various, even Low Saxon based dialects, but was almost completely based on the low Frankish urban dialects from Holland.